Cross-platform application development for desktop, mobile and embedded with modern web technology

The field of web technology is evolving at a rapid pace. Unlike Qt, which offers a complete, prepackaged solution, there is a multitude of tools and libraries which need to be combined into a functional stack. This article presents a stack proven in cross-platform projects and our experience gathered with it.

Introduction

Modern web technology provides a powerful foundation for cross-platform application development. By using responsive design techniques a browser based application can already cover desktop and mobile platforms. Using the right set of tools, such an application can be developed further into a real mobile app and/or an embedded touch interface.

The building blocks of a modern “cross-platform web application” are the web runtime environment, the single-page application and the back-end system. Let’s have a look at the definition of these three terms and their relation to each other.

platform_layers_cropped Continue reading Cross-platform application development for desktop, mobile and embedded with modern web technology

Greetings from Nuremberg!

Also this year you can meet the basyskom staff at the Embedded World trade show, stand 400 in hall 4.
We present a connected HMI scenario in an industrial setup, having interesting discussions. Topics are QtOpcUA, QtWebChannel and more. It is those applications of our customers out there in the field which make our business so fascinating!

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Storage of QML defined properties explained (Part 1)

How much does a property you define in QML code cost in terms of memory? This simple question led me down a merry chase into the source of the QML engine. The result is this article and in the end a contribution to Qt5.6.

Before we get started, let’s do a quick recap of what we know about Qt properties on the C++ side. Qt has compile time properties which can be added to QObject derived classes. The various methods associated with such a property (read/write/reset/notify/…) are specified using the Q_PROPERTY macro. The properties themselves are typically stored as C++ member variables. They integrate with the meta object system and are therefore also accessible from the QML-side.

Back to the initial question: how much memory is needed for a QML defined property? To answer this, one first needs to figure out how and where they are Continue reading Storage of QML defined properties explained (Part 1)