basysKom talks at Qt World Summit 2019 (4/4)

After initiating Qt OPC UA in 2015 and significant effort in research and development, first customer solutions were successfully realized in 2019. A good point in time to have a closer look into the usage of the API.

Industrial integration out of the box – Qt OPC UA, to be presented by Frank Meerkötter (4/4)

OPC UA is a standard for data modeling and machine to machine communication originating from the industrial automation space. Nowadays it is used in a diverse, growing set of industries. Its mission statement is to enable easy integration and interoperability between machines, components and applications of different vendors. OPC UA is an important building block of the Industry 4.0 story. This presentation will highlight how Qt fits into the picture – by presenting the Qt OPC UA API, its features and capabilities.

The core goal of Qt OPC UA is to make it easy to integrate OPC UA services into Qt applications. It first entered the scene as a contribution by basysKom which became a technology preview with Qt 5.11. Since then, The Qt Company and basysKom invested significantly to mature the API and to add missing features. Most prominently are the addition of support for secure connections, service discovery, events and a brand new QML API.

The presentation provides a starting point to develop OPC UA enabled Qt applications and will walk the audience through a number of scenarios and how to handle them with Qt OPC UA using both the C++ and the QML API.

  • Basic API concepts
  • Connecting to a server
  • Browsing
  • Access to nodes
  • Monitoring values changes
  • Method calls

The presentation provides the audience with a starting point to develop own OPC UA enabled Qt applications.

basysKom talks at Qt World Summit 2019 (3/4)

Not a ten year jubilee, but close – join Jeremias on a nine year Qt Quick retrospective (Nov. 6th).

Qt Quick -what could possibly go wrong…”, to be presented by Jeremias Bosch (3/4)

The last nine years basysKom provided “rescue services” for numerous Qt Quick projects. This talk presents a moody retrospective – offering the audience the unique opportunity to learn from the failure of others.

Once upon a time we all started our first QML project. The first impression being “wow, that was easy!”. We were full of joy, believing in the quickness and broad simplification that Qt Quick would bring into our lifes. Widgets were so outdated that most of us forgot that they even existed. The future was touchable, quick, bright and shiny. Qt Quick projects grew from a first small patch of code into green gardens, prospered into parks, … and sometimes they grew into wild jungles ruled by darkness; where wild roots and thick undergrowth stopped every movement, where the trees of objects grew so heavy on the memory of our targets that shipping down the river of production was as unlikely as seeing the sun at the north pole in winter times …

Based on our project experience this talk will present a sightseeing tour of several close encounters for projects involving Qt Quick. It will dig for the root causes and apart from a good laugh we will provide the audience with sustainable solutions. Those can be adapted or adopted to avoid growing a jungle.

basysKom talks at Qt World Summit 2019 (2/4)

The web and its immense success over the last 20 years had a major influence on technology. It has shaped how we serialize data, consume and provide services and how we develop HMIs.  The next talk presented by basysKom will provide a survey on how this challenge is addressed by Qt.

Qt and the web – where are we today, to be presented by Frank Meerkötter

The presentation is split into three parts.

1) Consuming and interfacing with web-centric services and APIs from a Qt application. Applications that download additional information from a cloud-service or upload the result of their work into such a service are todays norm. We will look into how REST/WebSocket-APIs can be used, also covering topics such as SSL, authentication and authorization. 

2) Implementing services and APIs to be consumed by other – web-centric systems – with Qt. There are a number of scenarios where a Qt application is providing (web)services itself. These include Qt being used headless on an embedded system to implement the backend for a web-based HMI, Qt being used on the server to make an established application accessible to the web, or giving testers (which prefer scripting languages) access to the internals of a Qt HMI. We will look at the upcoming QHttpServer module and the QWebSocketServer module provided by Qt.

3) HMI development. There are a number of scenarios where an HMI needs to run a web browser. This can either mean an HMI that is implemented using Web-technologies (by preference) or a Qt HMI needs to be run in a web browser. Scenarios include embedded devices without a display, giving remote access to HMIs and having an embedded web browser to display a web-based HMI, while the backend is implemented using Qt. We will look at Qt’s webgl-streaming, how to get an application to output VNC (which can be streamed into a browser) as well as what can be done with  Qt for WebAssemby. For the embedded web browser scenario we will look at the Qt WebEngine and how to integrate business logic via QWebChannel.

For each of these three areas we will look into typical scenarios/problems and how to solve them with Qt. We will highlight where Qt really shines and where additional work is left to be done.

basysKom talks at Qt World Summit 2019 (1/4)

This year’s Qt World Summit is just around the corner and basysKom will present four talks in Berlin. Follow us for more details until the event starts.

Qt Quick on low-end i.MX6 devices, to be presented by Jeremias Bosch

Embedded Linux in combination with Qt and Qt Quick are a widespread combination for the development of modern, complex and animated touch HMIs. This technology mixture is used for applications such as in-car infotainment, industrial controls, portable measurement devices or medical systems.

In an ideal world the embedded board is a power house, allowing smooth user experience, small startup time and low latency without the need of spending time and effort into optimization. But not all products can afford a high end i.MX6 with a dual or even quad core CPU with a powerful GPU. Price sensitive applications are often implemented with more affordable, but at the same time less powerful variants such as an i.MX6 dual lite or even smaller. With the consequence, that implementing a top of the line, complex HMI on a small i.MX6 can be a challenge.

The lecture will reflect best practises using Qt Quick on small devices, in particular the i.MX6 dual lite and SoloX. The audience will get a first set of do’s and don’ts, kick starting own Qt Quick projects on low end hardware.